Having a Hysteroscopy can help solve infertility problems

A hysteroscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine and evaluate the changes in the uterus and carry out necessary surgical operations. How is such a modern surgery implemented and what are it’s strengths? We talk about it with our Northway Medical Centre’s obstetrician-gynaecologist, dr. Rolandas Ziobakas.

obstetrician-gynaecologist Rolandas Ziobakas Hysteroscopy

Q – In what cases is there a need to perform a Hysteroscopy operation?

A – A hysteroscopy is often performed as part of  infertility treatment, as well as some other reasons (for example, failure to remove uterine contraceptive coil).

A hysteroscopy is usually performed when the patient has endometrial polyps or myoma, which are deform the uterine cavity; or when there’s a suspicion of endometrial hyperplasia (hypertrophy). These endometrial pathological changes can cause pain, along with irregular and heavy periods. During a hysteroscopy we carry out an accurate diagnosis and then remove uterine polyps or myoma. After this procedure the patient’s abnormal bleeding stops. If a woman complains about significant and prolonged bleeding during menstruation or irregular uterine bleeding, and the bleeding cannot be treated simply with medication, hysteroscopycal ablation surgery is usually recommended. This endoscopic procedure often becomes an alternative to hysterectomy. When there is an unexplained bleeding from the uterus during the postmenopausal period, diagnostic hysteroscopy helps to identify the cause of the bleeding, which can be a malignant tumour in the uterus.

 Q – You mention that a hysteroscopy can be carried out for infertility treatment. Does this mean that having the operation can increase the possibility a woman has for getting pregnant?

A- Yes, this method is suitable for those who cannot conceive or carry a foetus. Infertility may be caused by abnormalities in the uterus such as intra uterine adhesions,  the presence of a uterine septum, myoma, or uterine cavity deformation. Cervical internal adhesions may occur after previous uterine intervention procedures (e.g., uterine curettage operations due to heavy bleeding), or uterine abnormalities confirmed only after endoscopic operations.

After a hysteroscopy it is possible to evaluate, diagnose or rule out the suspected illness. If a woman has experienced several consecutive early recurrent miscarriages, a hysteroscopy would help determine a possible reason for this. For example – a malformation like a partial uterine septum, which can be removed. More often, it is enough to make a small surgical correction before success in conceiving is achieved. However, when this method is inefficient, medical treatments or assisted reproductive techniques can be adjusted.

Q –  Is this method suitable for all women?

A –  Hysteroscopy cannot be performed if a woman is pregnant, suffering from genital inflammation, cervical cancer, or if she has serious health problems. In this case she would be examined and treated using other methods.

Q –  How the hysteroscopy is performed?

A –  The patient is more often under general, usually intravenous anaesthesia during the surgery so she does not feel any pain. The surgeon will use a device called a speculum to open up the walls of the vagina. They will then insert the hysteroscope (a thin telescope-like device) through the cervix, into the uterus with a small amount of fluid for the uterine cavity to widen. The gynaecologist inspects the cervical canal and uterine cavity – all clearly visible on a nearby monitor. If the doctor finds any pathological changes – he removes them. If there any suspicions of a endometrial condition, a biopsy test is performed – a little piece of tissue is taken.

We perform a particularly sustainable hysteroscopy, using thinner than usual instruments. Because of this the patient feels less discomfort after the surgery.

Q – What are the benefits of hysteroscopy? And what about recovery?

A –  A Hysteroscopy is done all at clear sight, so any uterus disease diagnosis is very reliable. After surgery, the pain is minimal as there are no incisions or wounds in the abdomen,  so there is no risk of wound infections. In addition, the patient can be discharged on the same day after surgery, and on the next day she would be ready to return to work. For a period of one to two weeks after the surgery it is not recommended to swim or to use tampons.

 

Hysteroscopy in private clinic costs from £950 including anaesthesia and 1 day after-care in the clinic.

Click here for the list of infertility treatments we offer, and prices.

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Info@bodybureau.co.uk  Tel. +44 (0) 207 617 7301

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